About

Jason Reiflerpolitical scienceI am currently a Senior Lecturer of Politics at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. I study political behavior, with most of my time devoted to studying public opinion about foreign policy, correcting factual misperceptions held by citizens, and voting behavior.  A more detailed explanation of my research–with links to my publications and working papers–can be found below.

At Exeter, I am currently teaching War and Public Opinion and Experimental Research in the Social Sciences.  I moved to Exeter in September 2013. I was previously on the faculty at Georgia State University (2007-2013), where I was promoted to Associate Professor before trying a new adventure overseas.

I received a BA from Colby College and a PhD from Duke University.  Prior to grad school, I spent four years in Washington, DC working for the polling firm Bennett, Petts, and Blumenthal.

I am married and have two daughters, Eleanor and Lila.  When I am not doing political science, I spend time playing with my family, cooking, making terrible noises on a guitar, or watching my favorite sports teams.

Research

Foreign Policy Attitudes

A major part of my research agenda is studying how the public thinks about foreign policy and war. My work shows that citizen attitudes about foreign policy are broadly consistent with cost-benefit calculations.  The principal contribution of my work with Chris Gelpi and Peter Feaver—as seen in our book Paying the Human Costs of War and multiple journal articles—is to show the importance of perceptions of success in shaping citizen attitudes and support for war. More specifically, we show that prospective judgments of perceptions of success and retrospective judgments of whether a war was the “right thing” (and the interaction between them) is crucial to understanding how many casualties the public will accept before coming to oppose a war. We find that the public is willing to tolerate high levels of casualties for successful wars, but few if any casualties for unsuccessful wars. Our work is a powerful corrective against the conventional wisdom that arose out of the Vietnam War—that the public is reflexively opposed to casualties and that support for a war invariably collapses “once the body bags start coming home.” In addition, my research in this area shows that foreign policy concerns matter for elections and vote choice.

Foreign policy publications and working papers

Book

Gelpi, Christopher, Peter Feaver, and Jason Reifler. 2009. Paying the Human Costs of War: American Public Opinion and Casualties in Military Conflicts. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Journal Articles

Reifler, Jason, Thomas Scotto, Harold Clarke, David Sanders, Marianne Stewart, and Paul Whiteley. Forthcoming. “Prudence, Principle And Minimal Heuristics: British Public Opinion Towards The Use Of Military Force In Afghanistan And Libya.” British Journal of Politics and International Relations.

Grieco, Joseph, Christopher Gelpi, Jason Reifler, and Peter Feaver. 2011. “Let’s Get a Second Opinion: International Institutions and American Public Support for War.” International Studies Quarterly 55(2): 563-583.

Reifler, Jason, Thomas J. Scotto, and Harold Clarke.  2011. “Foreign Policy Beliefs in Contemporary Britain: Structure and Relevance.” International Studies Quarterly 55(1):245-266.

Gelpi, Christopher and Jason Reifler. 2008. “Success Still Matters: A Response to Berinsky and Druckman.” Public Opinion Quarterly 72(1):125-133.

Gelpi, Christopher, Jason Reifler, and Peter Feaver. 2007. “Iraq the Vote: Retrospective and Prospective Foreign Policy Judgments on Candidate Choice and Casualty Tolerance.” 2007. Political Behavior 29(2):151-174.

Gelpi, Christopher and Jason Reifler. 2006 “Casualties, Polls, and the Iraq War.” 2006. International Security 31(2):194-198. [Short rejoinder to Louis Klarevas published in letters section; not peer reviewed.]

Aldrich, John, Peter Feaver, Christopher Gelpi, Jason Reifler, and Kristin Sharp. 2006. “Foreign Policy and the Electoral Connection.” 2006.  Annual Review of Political Science 9:477-502.

Gelpi, Christopher, Peter Feaver, and Jason Reifler. 2005/2006. “Success Matters: Casualty Sensitivity and the War in Iraq.” International Security 30(3):7-46

Reports

Scotto, Thomas, Jason Reifler, Harold Clarke, Julio Amador Diaz Lopez, David Sanders, Marianne Stewart, and Paul Whiteley. “Attitudes towards British Involvement in Afghanistan.” University of Essex, Institute for Democracy and Conflict Resolution.

 

Misperceptions and Corrections

While political scientists and survey researchers have provided ample evidence that the public is ill-informed, much less work has focused on whether and how it is possible to correct the misperceptions that citizens hold.  My co-author Brendan Nyhan and I seek to better understand the conditions under which citizens learn, and hope (perhaps naively) to use what we learn to improve political discourse.  Our 2010 article “When Corrections Fail: The Persistence of Political Misperceptions” shows that motivated reasoning interferes with corrections. In some instances, we find that giving subjects correct information actually makes their misperceptions worse.  We are currently researching ways that misperceptions can effectively be countered, including the

Misperceptions publications and working papers

Journal Articles

Cobb, Michael, Brendan Nyhan, and Jason Reifler. 2013. “Beliefs Dont Always Persevere: How political figures are punished when positive information about them is discredited.” Political Psychology 34(3):307-326.

Nyhan, Brendan, Jason Reifler, and Peter Ubel. 2013. “The Hazards of Correcting Myths About Health Care Reform.” Medical Care 51(2): 127-132.

Nyhan, Brendan and Jason Reifler. 2010. “When Corrections Fail: The Persistence of Political Misperceptions.” Political Behavior 32(2):303-330.

Reports

Nyhan, Brendan and Jason Reifler. 2013.

Nyhan, Brendan and Jason Reifler. 2012. “Misinformation and Fact-checking: Research Findings from Social Science.” New America Foundation, Media Policy Initiative.

Working Papers

 

Voting Behavior

Why do citizens support one candidate over another? Perhaps there is no question more central to political science. Yet, voting behavior is more than just how issues, candidates, and the economy affect elections. Voting behavior includes the preferences that citizens have over institutional rules. My research shows that average voters are sophisticated enough to strategically prefer one set of institutional rules over another based on how it would advantage their political preferences, at least in the short run.

Voting behavior publications

Journal Articles

Aldrich, John, Jason Reifler, and Michael C. Munger. Forthcoming. “Sophisticated and myopic? Citizen preferences for Electoral College reform.” Public Choice.

Aldrich, John, Michael Munger, and Jason Reifler. Forthcoming. “Institutions, Information, and Faction: An Experimental Test of Riker’s Federalism Thesis for Political Parties.” Public Choice.

Clarke, Harold, Allan Kornberg, Thomas J. Scotto, Jason Reifler, David Sanders, Marianne Stewart, and Paul Whiteley. 2011. “Yes We Can! Valence Politics And Electoral Choice In America, 2008.” Electoral Studies 30:450-461.

Reifler, Jason, Thomas J. Scotto, and Harold Clarke. 2011. “Foreign Policy Beliefs in Contemporary Britain: Structure and Relevance.” International Studies Quarterly 55(1): 245-266.

Scotto, Thomas J., Harold Clarke, Allan Kornberg, Jason Reifler, David Sanders, Marianne Stewart, and Paul Whiteley. 2010. “The Dynamic Political Economy of Support for Barack Obama during the 2008 Presidential Election Campaign.” Electoral Studies 29(4):545-556.

Gelpi, Christopher, Jason Reifler, and Peter Feaver. 2007. “Iraq the Vote: Retrospective and Prospective Foreign Policy Judgments on Candidate Choice and Casualty Tolerance.” 2007. Political Behavior 29(2):151-174.

Aldrich, John, Peter Feaver, Christopher Gelpi, Jason Reifler, and Kristin Sharp. 2006. “Foreign Policy and the Electoral Connection.” 2006. Annual Review of Political Science 9:477-502.

Chapters

Clarke, Harold, Thomas Scotto, Jason Reifler, and Allan Kornberg. 2011. “Winners and Losers: Voters in the 2011 Federal Election” in The Canadian Federal Election of 2011, eds. Jon Pammet and Christopher Dornan. Toronto, Canada: Durndun.

Wilcox, Clyde, Alexandra Cooper, Peter Francia, John C. Green, Paul S. Herrnson, Lynda Powell, Jason Reifler, Mark Rozell, and Ben Webster. “With Limits Raised, Who Will Give More? The Impact of BCRA on Individual Donors to Federal Candidates” in Life After Reform: When The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act Meets Politics, ed. Michael Malbin. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003.

Public Health and Health Behavior

Public health publications

Journal Articles

Nyhan, Brendan, Jason Reifler, and Peter Ubel. 2013. “The Hazards of Correcting Myths About Health Care Reform.” Medical Care 51(2):127-132.

Nyhan, Brendan, Jason Reifler, and Sean Richey. 2012. “The Role of Social Networks in Influenza Vaccine Attitudes and Intentions Among College Students.” Journal of Adolescent Health 51(3): 302-304.

 

Miscellaneous

Some of my papers just don’t fall neatly with the rest of my work.

Franklin, Dan, Jason Reifler, and Joseph Weinberg. Forthcoming. “Teaching Writing and Critical Thinking in Large Political Science Classes.” Journal of Political Science Education.